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Meet the Artists Part 4/Day 3 of Giveaway

WELCOME to DAY 4 of the kick off for my latest book, Creative Image Transfer: 16 New Mixed Media Projects Using TAP Transfer Artist Paper.

Over FIVE days I am introducing you to the 10 contributing artists and their thoughts and experience on working with TAP Transfer Artist Paper.

Some, like Seth Apter and Pam Carriker had never used TAP before. Lu Peters and Marie Z. Johansen are long-time users who can’t get enough of it. All 10 of the artists have shared their candid thoughts on TAP and the Aha! moments they had that will lead them to other ideas, inspiration and art. Complete instructions for all of their projects are in the book.

Sit back, enjoy the ride and LEAVE A COMMENT for a daily drawing for the book, TAP or BOTH.

The drawing begins on Tuesday, August 5 and ends on Sunday noon EST on August 10. Daily winners will be posted the following day. Enter each day for MORE chances to win!

(Be sure to check out yesterday’s post on artists Paula Bogdan and Lynn Krawczyk.)


The week is a whirlwind. Keep your comments coming for more chances to win. Thank you, thank you for stopping by.

Today’s winner is #206 (generated by Random.org) = Patti Edmon. Congratulations Patti!

Patti will receive a copy of Creative Image Transfer AND a 5-sheet pack of TAP Transfer Artist Paper. If your name is not Patti Edmon, feel free to enter again today for tomorrow’s drawing.


Say HELLO to MARIE Z. JOHANSEN

Marie makes unique, one-of-a-kind, hand crafted art designed with joy in mind! When I asked around online for people who used TAP, Marie answered my call. She has TAPped her way through all sort of projects, most often using her own photographs.

A talented photographer, whose first camera was a Brownie (remember those?), Marie’s photography skills were honed in photography school. It’s her belief that every picture really does tell a story.

Her Creative Image Transfer project – Buddha Bag – now hangs on my shoulder. She is very generous with her art and talent. If you want to make one of your own, all of her instructions are in the book – even how she ages Kraft-Tex to look like leather.

Marie says, “TAP is the easiest image transfer that I have ever tried…that’s why I continue to use it ! I realized that I could, truly, use TAP on just about any surface that I wanted to. I also realized how easy the image would be to “distress” or manipulate prior to transfer.

The best things about TAP are its ease of use, the quality of the transferred image, the ability to manipulate the image prior to transferring, and the vibrancy of the transferred image.”

See more of Marie’s creations at Musing Crow Designs.

 

ENCAUSTIC ARTIST LAURA LARUE

Laura LaRue has been a high school art teacher for 18 years and still finds the time to create her own beautiful work. Kudos to Laura!

She works primarily in encaustics, but only recently began! Her work is striking and I love how she incorporates her own drawing into the encaustic paintings. TAP was new to Laura, but now she’s hooked.

Laura wants you to know that “TAP is incredibly easy to use and comes with very clear instructions. If you can use a printer and an iron, then you can use TAP!” Working in encaustics, Laura has tried many methods of transferring images to the wax. She believes that ” TAP stays put better than a traditional image transfer. I am so happy I can paint [wax] on top of the TAP image without worrying about it smearing.”

In an Aha moment, Laura, who also dabbles in jewelry thought “TAP might provide a great resist for acid etching copper.”

Her top reasons for choosing TAP? “I love the fact you can draw or paint right on the TAP. It’s perfect for that spontaneous artistic moment! And not to mention the fact that TAP will transfer to practically any surface.

And the best reason is there are so many awesome new TAP projects in the book that I can’t wait to try out!”

I agree! See more of Laura’s work on her blog at Laruelapalooza.


Stop back tomorrow to hear from Joanne Sharp and Theresa Wells Stifel.